In a study of children aged 2-5, parents interrupted their daughters more than their sons, and fathers were more likely to talk simultaneously with their children than mothers were. Jennifer Coates says: “It seems that fathers try to control conversation more than mothers… and both parents try to control conversation more with daughters than with sons. The implicit message to girls is that they are more interruptible and that their right to speak is less than that of boys.”

Girls and boys’ differing understanding of when to talk, when to be quiet, what is polite and so on, has a visible impact on the dynamics of the classroom. Just as men dominate the floor in business meetings, academic conferences and so on, so little boys dominate in the classroom - and little girls let them.

Philippa Law, Classroom Talk (via eibmorb)

(Source: geviladaheel)

ohfantine:

"So long as there shall exist, by reason of law and custom, a social condemnation which, in the midst of civilization, artificially creates a hell on earth, and complicates with human fatality a destiny that is divine; so long as the three problems of the century - the degradation of man by the exploitation of his labour, the ruin of women by starvation and the atrophy of childhood by physical and spiritual night are not solved; so long as, in certain regions, social asphyxia shall be possible; in other words and from a still broader point of view, so long as ignorance and misery remain on earth, there should be a need for books such as this"

Italy + Water  x

When someone tells me they’re “not political”

campaignsick:

image

drewchainzzzz:

"Hey remember that time you…"

Yes. I remember every embarrassing thing I have ever done and chances are it keeps me up at night

mpdrolet:

Play of sunlight, Los Angeles, 1912
Louis Fleckenstein

mpdrolet:

Play of sunlight, Los Angeles, 1912

Louis Fleckenstein

(Source: russiancarpet)

nigerianostalgia:

Benedict Chukwukadibia Enwonwu in his art studio in Ikoyi, suburb of Lagos, Nigeria 1959.
Benedict Chukwukadibia Enwonwu (1921-1994) is the most renowned Nigerian artist of the 20th century. Already in 1937 Enwonwu held his first exhibition in London and drew favorable attention.
Twenty years later he became known as the sculptor who had been officially commissioned by the British court to make a bronze bust of Queen Elizabeth II. Enwonwu´s creations use, on the one hand, the forms and hues of classical modernism and, on the other, the formal principles of West African tribal art.
Vintage Nigerian photos

nigerianostalgia:

Benedict Chukwukadibia Enwonwu in his art studio in Ikoyi, suburb of Lagos, Nigeria 1959.

Benedict Chukwukadibia Enwonwu (1921-1994) is the most renowned Nigerian artist of the 20th century. Already in 1937 Enwonwu held his first exhibition in London and drew favorable attention.

Twenty years later he became known as the sculptor who had been officially commissioned by the British court to make a bronze bust of Queen Elizabeth II. Enwonwu´s creations use, on the one hand, the forms and hues of classical modernism and, on the other, the formal principles of West African tribal art.

Vintage Nigerian photos

(Source: culturebase.net)

nedahoyin:

luvelieh:

x

This too..

nedahoyin:

luvelieh:

x

This too..

(Source: rawvegansous)