howaboutdisney:

YOU DESERVE AN AWARD AND DO U SEE KHAN WATCH HER AS SHE TURNS INTO A WARRIOR IM SCREAMING

howaboutdisney:

YOU DESERVE AN AWARD AND DO U SEE KHAN WATCH HER AS SHE TURNS INTO A WARRIOR IM SCREAMING

(Source: ice-solation)

I just had the most awkward conference call of my life

Like I’ve been in a lot of awkward moments in my life, but this is def top ten. I want to crawl into a cave and never deal with humanity again. 


Woops, there it is. (x)

Woops, there it is. (x)

(Source: book-choco-loco)

“If you ask a Mexican child in the first grade ‘why the hell are you eating a taco’ he’s going to go home and ask for a peanut butter sandwich.”
My professor on losing your identity as a kid (via lasfloresdemayo)
south-gothic:

roses—and—rue:
Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.
A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.
When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.
She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.
Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.
Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.
Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

south-gothic:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.

A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.

When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.

She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.

Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.

Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.

Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

thinkmexican:

1970 Chicano Moratorium

44 years ago today, 30,000 marched in East LA in the Chicano Moratorium in protest of the Vietnam War, and in an act of self-determination for Chicanos. Historians believe the Chicano Moratorium was one of the largest anti-war protests of its day and the first to call attention to the number of Chicanos disproportionately represented in Vietnam.

Thousands who gathered at Laguna Park after the march to listen to speakers and performers were forced to run for cover after deputies from the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department began brutally attacking march-goers with night sticks. Reporter Rubén Salazar was one of them.

Salazar, who was a well-known journalist, was killed later that evening at the Silver Dollar Bar on Whittier Boulevard when sheriff’s deputies shot a tear gas canister into the bar. The canister hit Salazar in the head and killed him instantly. Salazar had clashed with local police in the months before his death, reports the LA Times. Ángel Díaz and Lynn Ward also died that day.

See documentary on the Chicano Moratorium. More stories here.

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deadtrash:

"thats not very lady-like of you"

image

girlsgetbusyzine:

Taken from MANTRAS zine
This zine is a culmination of how i got myself thru/still getting myself thru things and also things that i love and things that make me happy, mostly Stevie Nicks. I hope i don’t come off as someone who has her shit together, most of this zine is me yelling at myself and it’s really difficult to follow the directions that i give to myself, like “TAKE WHAT’S YOURS” and “DON’T HIDE!” it’s very difficult and on most days i don’t follow these directions and i fail completely. But i still yell at myself because it’s necessary that i always have these things etched in me so i have something to hold on to when shit hits the fan. - Fabiola

girlsgetbusyzine:

Taken from MANTRAS zine

This zine is a culmination of how i got myself thru/still getting myself thru things and also things that i love and things that make me happy, mostly Stevie Nicks. I hope i don’t come off as someone who has her shit together, most of this zine is me yelling at myself and it’s really difficult to follow the directions that i give to myself, like “TAKE WHAT’S YOURS” and “DON’T HIDE!” it’s very difficult and on most days i don’t follow these directions and i fail completely. But i still yell at myself because it’s necessary that i always have these things etched in me so i have something to hold on to when shit hits the fan. - Fabiola


Unlike the white artists that surround themselves with black friends (in music videos, at least) and markers of black culture to prove they’re cool and a little bit dangerous, Taylor does the opposite. She surrounds herself with hip hop and breakdancing, but the point is to reject those things with a self-deprecating attitude. When we see Taylor goofily failing to twerk, she seems to be saying, “haha I’m such a white girl, this is so embarrassing,” which is actually code for “haha I fail at being sexual or dirty or threatening, I’m just innocent and endearing.”
Yet Taylor manages to act both innocent and sexy, particularly when she sings about “the fella over there with the hella good hair” who should “come on over, baby, we could shake, shake, shake.” Embodying both sides of the coin is a feat rarely achieved, though if anyone could do it, it would definitely be a white woman. But it’s only one of Taylor’s several balancing acts within the video—like how she’s bad at ballet because she shakes her hips too much, but she’s bad at twerking because she doesn’t shake her hips enough. Like how she uses hip hop elements and the presence of people of color to prove her newfound edginess while also reassuring (white) America that she’s still sweet as apple pie.
-Celeste Montaño, Taylor Swift can’t shake off white privilege

Unlike the white artists that surround themselves with black friends (in music videos, at least) and markers of black culture to prove they’re cool and a little bit dangerous, Taylor does the opposite. She surrounds herself with hip hop and breakdancing, but the point is to reject those things with a self-deprecating attitude. When we see Taylor goofily failing to twerk, she seems to be saying, “haha I’m such a white girl, this is so embarrassing,” which is actually code for “haha I fail at being sexual or dirty or threatening, I’m just innocent and endearing.”

Yet Taylor manages to act both innocent and sexy, particularly when she sings about “the fella over there with the hella good hair” who should “come on over, baby, we could shake, shake, shake.” Embodying both sides of the coin is a feat rarely achieved, though if anyone could do it, it would definitely be a white woman. But it’s only one of Taylor’s several balancing acts within the video—like how she’s bad at ballet because she shakes her hips too much, but she’s bad at twerking because she doesn’t shake her hips enough. Like how she uses hip hop elements and the presence of people of color to prove her newfound edginess while also reassuring (white) America that she’s still sweet as apple pie.

-Celeste Montaño, Taylor Swift can’t shake off white privilege

Social justice is about destroying systematic marginalisation and privilege. Wishing to live in a more just, more equal world is simply not the same thing as wishing to live in a “nicer” world. I am not suggesting niceness is bad or that we should not behave in a nice way towards others if we want to! I also do not equate niceness with cooperation or collaboration with others. Here’s all I am saying: the conflation of ethical or just conduct (goodness), and polite conduct (niceness) is a big problem.

Plenty of oppressive bullshit goes down under the guise of nice. Every day, nice, caring, friendly people try to take our bodily autonomy away from us (women, queers, trans people, nonbinaries, fat people, POC…you name it, they just don’t think we know what’s good for us!). These people would hold a door for us if they saw us coming. Our enemies are not only the people holding “Fags Die God Laughs” signs, they are the nice people who just feel like marriage should be between a man and a woman, no offense, it’s just how they feel! We once got a very nice comment on this site that we decided we could not publish because its content was “But how can I respect women when they dress like – sorry to say it, pardon my language – sluts?”. This is vile, disgusting misogyny and no amount of sugar coating and politeness can make it okay. Similarly, most of the people who run ex-gay therapy clinics are actually very nice and polite! They just want to save you! Nicely! Clearly, niceness means FUCK ALL.

The Revolution Will Not Be Polite: The Issue of Nice versus Good - http://www.socialjusticeleague.net/2012/04/the-revolution-will-not-be-polite-the-issue-of-nice-versus-good/ (via varldslighet)

I feel like this concept is pretty vital to Good Reason News as well.

(via goodreasonnews)

Courtesy is something that is earned, and you will not earn it by oppressing someone. And fyi, treating someone as a person, not using sexist/racist/homophobic/transphobic/ableist slurs, and/or using the correct gender identiy for others is a requirement, not a courtesy.

(via moniquill)

Like I said “politeness” and tone policing is simply insisting being violent, insulting and hateful in a polite way is somehow acceptable.

(via bankuei)

(Source: transrants)